Prepping Home For Your Pawsome Friend’s Homecoming? Consider These 7 Things

Posted on Feb 15 2017 - 8:32pm by Johnny B

Puppies are little bundles of joy. They may be small, but put a big responsibility on their owners.  They play with you, cheer you up, grow up to be your best pal, are great conversation initiators, and spread joy wherever they go. No wonder a majority of Australians love them. But what most people don’t know is that their presence in your house also offers health benefits. They lower one’s blood pressure, provide the owner with opportunities to increase their physical activity levels, strengthen the immune system in kids and also reduce the risk of allergies.   

If this has convinced you to get a puppy, we have some valuable words of advice for you.

1.      Assign Responsibilities:

Before you get a new puppy, prepare yourself for all the responsibilities. If more than one person is going to take care of the puppy, it is best to assign duties. Distribute tasks such as who will feed it, who will take it out, who will housetrain it, who will take it to dog care centres like Spoilt Rotten Dogs, who will be in charge of taking them to vet appointments, etc. If you feel that others in the house might not to be up for the task, it is best to delay getting a new puppy for some time.

2.      Pet-Proof your place:

Dog-proofing is important. The new puppy will feel out of the place for a few weeks in the beginning. They might portray fear, aggression or boredom by chewing on your furniture, scratching the rugs, getting tangled in electrical wiring or breaking stuff. Thus, it is best to pet-proof it.

3.      Apply for a license:

Before you bring the pet home, ensure that you have legalised the ownership. Avoid leaving the task pending if you don’t know how to obtain a license. Ask your friends, neighbours or family who already have a dog or go to your nearest shelter home to obtain one.

4.      Store Essentials:

Stockpile essentials like harnesses, chew toys, food, and a dog bed before you bring a puppy home. This way, it will be easier for them to adjust into their new home.

5.      Give them some space:

Instead of pouncing, give the puppy some personal space until it stops feeling alienated on its own. Excessive attention will only make them feel more intimidated.

6.      Seek help from a Trusted Vet:

You may need to get your new puppy a number of vaccinations to ensure your family’s safety. Get in touch with a nearby veterinarian at the earliest.

7.      Don’t Give Sibling Rivalry a Chance:

If you already have other dogs in the house, chances are that the new puppy will have a difficult time blending in. Moreover, ensure that before you bring in the new puppy, your place is clear of any items of your resident dog. Every new pet easily gets excited about chewy toys, food bowls and beds. A new puppy’s presence might seem threatening to your resident dog and it might even try to prove dominance by showing aggression.